A Sunday Drive

Ed Sweeney with Cathy Clasper-Torch

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A Sunday Drive was inspired by an image my friend, photographer Cindy Wilson, shared on social media. Cindy’s photo is of an old car sitting in front of a gas station.

Everything, including the station, had been abandoned for years: the car, tire rims, license plates, gas pumps - one of the pumps had leaded gasoline at $0.32 cents a gallon.

I have

A Sunday Drive was inspired by an image my friend, photographer Cindy Wilson, shared on social media. Cindy’s photo is of an old car sitting in front of a gas station.

Everything, including the station, had been abandoned for years: the car, tire rims, license plates, gas pumps - one of the pumps had leaded gasoline at $0.32 cents a gallon.

I have driven over 500,000 miles performing over the years and have seen similar images time and time again. You find these markers of what life used to be when you are willing to travel off the main highway.

A Sunday Drive is an eclectic collection of markers. I, with the help of my friend Cathy Clasper-Torch, wanted to capture the variety of music heard over the car radio, heard at a farmer’s market, sung or played from a front porch as you drive around. A few of the songs and instrumental are markers of what used to be. A couple of songs and instrumentals are markers of what I have seen.

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Bury Me Not On The Lone Prairie - This song is intrinsically and instantly old time from the first note, you can hear that its essence is truly much older than anyone nowadays can compose. But Ed Sweeney (with Cathy Clasper-Torch and Daryl Jamieson) do the entire thing perfect justice with the instrument choice, playing style and vocal delivery. It sounds like just a man on his banjo and a lonesome distant plucking sound with a rattle and drum, like it would sound if you were alone on the prairie playing around the fire at night all alone with some accompaniment in your mind. Listen and see ” - Melissa Clarke

Americana Highways